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digitalmars.D.learn - Conditional Compilation Multiple Versions

reply bitwise <bitwise.pvt gmail.com> writes:
Is there a way to compile for multiple conditions?

Tried all these:

version(One | Two){ }
version(One || Two){ }
version(One && Two){ }
version(One) |  version(Two){ }
version(One) || version(Two){ }
version(One) && version(Two){ }

   Bit
Jun 12 2015
next sibling parent reply Mike Parker <aldacron gmail.com> writes:
On 6/13/2015 9:41 AM, bitwise wrote:
 Is there a way to compile for multiple conditions?

 Tried all these:

 version(One | Two){ }
 version(One || Two){ }
 version(One && Two){ }
 version(One) |  version(Two){ }
 version(One) || version(Two){ }
 version(One) && version(Two){ }

    Bit
// config.d version(One) enum One = true; else enum One = false; version(Two) enum Two = true; else enum Two = false; // other.d import config; static if(One || Two) { ... }
Jun 12 2015
parent reply "anonymous" <anonymous example.com> writes:
On Saturday, 13 June 2015 at 00:47:37 UTC, Mike Parker wrote:
 // config.d
 version(One) enum One = true;
 else enum One = false;

 version(Two) enum Two = true;
 else enum Two = false;

 // other.d
 import config;
 static if(One || Two) {
     ...
 }
Taking it one step further: template Version(string name) { mixin(" version("~name~") enum Version = true; else enum Version = false; "); } static if(Version!"One" || Version!"Two") { ... }
Jun 13 2015
parent reply ketmar <ketmar ketmar.no-ip.org> writes:
On Sat, 13 Jun 2015 13:49:49 +0000, anonymous wrote:

 Taking it one step further:
=20
 template Version(string name)
 {
      mixin("
          version("~name~") enum Version =3D true;
          else enum Version =3D false;
      ");
 }
=20
 static if(Version!"One" || Version!"Two")
 {
      ...
 }
very elegant.=
Jun 13 2015
parent bitwise <bitwise.pvt gmail.com> writes:
On Sat, 13 Jun 2015 12:20:40 -0400, ketmar <ketmar ketmar.no-ip.org> wrote:

 On Sat, 13 Jun 2015 13:49:49 +0000, anonymous wrote:

 Taking it one step further:

 template Version(string name)
 {
      mixin("
          version("~name~") enum Version = true;
          else enum Version = false;
      ");
 }

 static if(Version!"One" || Version!"Two")
 {
      ...
 }
very elegant.
Elegant indeed, but I think my pull request would be frowned upon if I tried to use this in druntime. Bit
Jun 13 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent reply =?UTF-8?B?Ik3DoXJjaW8=?= Martins" <marcioapm gmail.com> writes:
On Saturday, 13 June 2015 at 00:42:00 UTC, bitwise wrote:
 Is there a way to compile for multiple conditions?
version(One) version = OneOrTwo; else version(Two) version = OneOrTwo; version(OneOrTwo) { writeln("moo"); } --- version(One) version(Two) version = OneAndTwo; version(OneAndTwo) { writeln("moo moo"); } I know... I too hate that one can't use simple logic ops...
Jun 12 2015
parent bitwise <bitwise.pvt gmail.com> writes:
On Fri, 12 Jun 2015 20:55:51 -0400, M=E1rcio Martins <marcioapm gmail.co=
m>  =

wrote:

 I know... I too hate that one can't use simple logic ops...
Indeed... Thanks. Bit
Jun 12 2015
prev sibling parent reply ketmar <ketmar ketmar.no-ip.org> writes:
On Fri, 12 Jun 2015 20:41:59 -0400, bitwise wrote:

 Is there a way to compile for multiple conditions?
=20
 Tried all these:
=20
 version(One | Two){ }
 version(One || Two){ }
 version(One && Two){ }
 version(One) |  version(Two){ }
 version(One) || version(Two){ }
 version(One) && version(Two){ }
=20
    Bit
nope. Walter is against that, so we'll not have it, despite the=20 triviality of the patch.=
Jun 13 2015
next sibling parent reply bitwise <bitwise.pvt gmail.com> writes:
On Sat, 13 Jun 2015 08:21:50 -0400, ketmar <ketmar ketmar.no-ip.org> wrote:

 On Fri, 12 Jun 2015 20:41:59 -0400, bitwise wrote:

 Is there a way to compile for multiple conditions?

 Tried all these:

 version(One | Two){ }
 version(One || Two){ }
 version(One && Two){ }
 version(One) |  version(Two){ }
 version(One) || version(Two){ }
 version(One) && version(Two){ }

    Bit
nope. Walter is against that, so we'll not have it, despite the triviality of the patch.
Any idea what the rationale was for not allowing it? Bit
Jun 13 2015
parent ketmar <ketmar ketmar.no-ip.org> writes:
On Sat, 13 Jun 2015 12:01:29 -0400, bitwise wrote:

 nope. Walter is against that, so we'll not have it, despite the
 triviality of the patch.
=20 Any idea what the rationale was for not allowing it?
i don't remember. that murmuring about "it makes the code harder to read"=20 goes beyond me, so it's hard to remember.=
Jun 13 2015
prev sibling parent reply Claude <no no.no> writes:
On Saturday, 13 June 2015 at 12:21:50 UTC, ketmar wrote:
 On Fri, 12 Jun 2015 20:41:59 -0400, bitwise wrote:

 Is there a way to compile for multiple conditions?
 
 Tried all these:
 
 version(One | Two){ }
 version(One || Two){ }
 version(One && Two){ }
 version(One) |  version(Two){ }
 version(One) || version(Two){ }
 version(One) && version(Two){ }
 
    Bit
nope. Walter is against that, so we'll not have it, despite the triviality of the patch.
I'm digging up that thread, as I want to do some multiple conditional compilation a well. I have a couple of questions: * Why is Walter against that? There must be some good reasons. * Is there an "idiomatic" or "elegant" way of doing it? Should we use Mike Parker solution, or use the "template Version(string name)" solution (which basically just circumvent "version" specific limitation)? Here' the kind of stuff I'd like to translate from C: #if defined(_MSC_VER) && !defined(__INTEL_COMPILER) #define YEP_MICROSOFT_COMPILER #elif defined(__GNUC__) && !defined(__clang__) && !defined(__INTEL_COMPILER) && !defined(__CUDA_ARCH__) #define YEP_GNU_COMPILER #elif defined(__INTEL_COMPILER) ... #if defined(_M_IX86) || defined(i386) || defined(__i386) || defined(__i386__) || defined(_X86_) || defined(__X86__) || defined(__I86__) || defined(__INTEL__) || defined(__THW_INTEL__) #define YEP_X86_CPU #define YEP_X86_ABI #elif defined(_M_X64) || defined(_M_AMD64) || defined(__amd64__) || defined(__amd64) || defined(__x86_64__) || defined(__x86_64) ...
Oct 20 2016
parent reply Claude <no no.no> writes:
On Thursday, 20 October 2016 at 09:58:07 UTC, Claude wrote:
 I'm digging up that thread, as I want to do some multiple 
 conditional compilation a well.
Well I'm digging up that thread again, but to post some positive experience feedback this time as I've found an answer to my own questions, and I thought I could share them. I wanted to convert some C preprocessing code to D: thousands of conditional compilation macros #ifdef, #if defined() used in a program that determine the capabilities of a platform (number of CPU cores, SIMD availability, etc). So it had to check compiler types and versions, combined with the target architecture, and the OS, and the endianess and so on. So the C implementation is a stream of: #if defined(MYOS) || defined(ARCHITECTURE) && defined(__weirdstuff) # define SPECIFIC FEATURE #else # blabla ... And I though I would have to use some || and && operators in my D code as well. So I did. I used that trick from Mike Parker and anonymous (see above in the thread) by declaring "enum bool"s to be checked with "static if"s later to implement specific feature. So I had a stream of: version (Win32) enum bool WindowsSupported = true; else enum bool WindowsSupported = false; version (Win64) enum bool WindowsSupported = true; //Ooops else enum bool WindowsSupported = false; //Ooops It turned out to be not so readable (even when using a "string mixin" to make the code tighter), and I cannot define twice an enum without using "static if", which was a deal-breaker. Also the conciseness of the versions for the D compilers (only 4: DMD, GDC, LDC and SDC), as well as the different OS versions made the code a lot tighter than the C version. So I just dropped the enum definition thing and just used "version" as it was designed to be used: version (Win32) version = WindowsSupported; else version (Win64) version = WindowsSupported; else etc... So to my older question:
 * Is there an "idiomatic" or "elegant" way of doing it? Should 
 we use Mike Parker solution, or use the "template 
 Version(string name)" solution (which basically just circumvent 
 "version" specific limitation)?
That little experience showed that using version as it is designed currently is enough to elegantly cover my needs. And it seemed to scale well. Also I think it may force developers to handle all version specific stuff into one specific module and define your own version identifiers to list features from compiler, OS, target architecture version identifiers; which is a good coding practice anyway. So: module mylib.platform; version (ThisOs) version = ThatFeature; else version = blabla; etc... And: module mylib.feature; void doFeature() { version (ThatFeature) blabla; } But again, that's just my feedback from one single experience (even though I think that kind of code is quite common in C/C++ cross-platform libraries). So I'm still curious as why Walter designed "version" that particular way, and if anyone has bumped on "version" (quasi-)limitations and what they think about it!
Jan 06 2017
parent reply Mike Parker <aldacron gmail.com> writes:
Glad hear it's working for you!

On Friday, 6 January 2017 at 10:25:26 UTC, Claude wrote:

 So I had a stream of:

 version (Win32)
   enum bool WindowsSupported = true;
 else
   enum bool WindowsSupported = false;

 version (Win64)
   enum bool WindowsSupported = true; //Ooops
 else
   enum bool WindowsSupported = false; //Ooops
These can be condensed to: version(Win32) enum bool WindowsSupported = true; else version(Win64) enum bool WindowsSupported = true; else enum bool WindowsSupported = false; Or even better, since it doesn't appear you need to distinguish between 32-bit & 64-bit: version(Windows) enum bool WindowsSupported = true; else enum bool WindowsSupported = false;
 It turned out to be not so readable (even when using a "string 
 mixin" to make the code tighter), and I cannot define twice an 
 enum without using "static if", which was a deal-breaker. Also 
 the conciseness of the versions for the D compilers (only 4: 
 DMD, GDC, LDC and SDC), as well as the different OS versions 
 made the code a lot tighter than the C version.
For me, the readability is no issue. I would put that block above in a single module (which I like to call config.d) and then import it where I need it. This actually is a lot cleaner for the corner cases where version breaks down (see below).
 So I just dropped the enum definition thing and just used 
 "version" as it was designed to be used:

 version (Win32)
   version = WindowsSupported;
 else version (Win64)
   version = WindowsSupported;
 else etc...
version(Windows) { }
 That little experience showed that using version as it is 
 designed currently is enough to elegantly cover my needs. And 
 it seemed to scale well.
 Also I think it may force developers to handle all version 
 specific stuff into one specific module and define your own 
 version identifiers to list features from compiler, OS, target 
 architecture version identifiers; which is a good coding 
 practice anyway.
Yes, it works quite well for most use cases and should generally be preferred. I disagree that it scales, though. At some point (a point that is highly project-dependent), it breaks down, requiring either very large modules or duplicated versions across multiple modules. My position is that I will always choose version blocks first, but if I find myself in a situation where I have to choose between duplicating version statements (e.g. version(A) {version=AorB; version=AorC;}) across multiple modules and restructuring my code to accommodate versioning, I much prefer to use the enum alternative as an escape hatch.
Jan 06 2017
parent reply Claude <no no.no> writes:
On Friday, 6 January 2017 at 13:27:06 UTC, Mike Parker wrote:
 version(Windows)
     enum bool WindowsSupported = true;
 else
     enum bool WindowsSupported = false;
Well, yes, that was a bad example. I thought to change it before sending my post but I could find any other meaningful alternative. My point was, that you can re-define WindowsSupported as a version even if it already defined, but not as an enum. And sometimes, you cannot simply use the else statement without creating another indented block (which seems a bit awkward).
 Yes, it works quite well for most use cases and should 
 generally be preferred. I disagree that it scales, though. At 
 some point (a point that is highly project-dependent), it 
 breaks down, requiring either very large modules or duplicated 
 versions across multiple modules.
Yes, in that case, you would probably break it down into several specialized config modules. I meant it forces you not to put directly version(Windows) into your code, but rather version(ThatFeatureSupportedByWindowsAmongstOtherOSs).
 My position is that I will always choose version blocks first, 
 but if I find myself in a situation where I have to choose 
 between duplicating version statements (e.g. version(A) 
 {version=AorB; version=AorC;}) across multiple modules and 
 restructuring my code to accommodate versioning, I much prefer 
 to use the enum alternative as an escape hatch.
Ok, that's interesting. Do you have code samples where you do that? I'm just curious.
Jan 06 2017
parent reply Joakim <dlang joakim.fea.st> writes:
On Friday, 6 January 2017 at 13:44:37 UTC, Claude wrote:
 Yes, it works quite well for most use cases and should 
 generally be preferred. I disagree that it scales, though. At 
 some point (a point that is highly project-dependent), it 
 breaks down, requiring either very large modules or duplicated 
 versions across multiple modules.
Yes, in that case, you would probably break it down into several specialized config modules. I meant it forces you not to put directly version(Windows) into your code, but rather version(ThatFeatureSupportedByWindowsAmongstOtherOSs).
Yes, this is the idiom that version() encourages. You can put all your configuration logic in one place in your build script and then pass -version=hasFeature to your build. If you use reggae, you can even write your configuration logic in D: https://github.com/atilaneves/reggae/
 My position is that I will always choose version blocks first, 
 but if I find myself in a situation where I have to choose 
 between duplicating version statements (e.g. version(A) 
 {version=AorB; version=AorC;}) across multiple modules and 
 restructuring my code to accommodate versioning, I much prefer 
 to use the enum alternative as an escape hatch.
Ok, that's interesting. Do you have code samples where you do that? I'm just curious.
Druntime uses this for its translation of POSIX header files: https://github.com/dlang/druntime/blob/master/src/core/sys/posix/config.d An example: https://github.com/dlang/druntime/blob/master/src/core/sys/posix/sys/resource.d#L96
Jan 07 2017
parent Claude <no no.no> writes:
 Druntime uses this for its translation of POSIX header files:

 https://github.com/dlang/druntime/blob/master/src/core/sys/posix/config.d

 An example:

 https://github.com/dlang/druntime/blob/master/src/core/sys/posix/sys/resource.d#L96
Ok, I see. Thanks! (I've gotta try reggae someday) :)
Jan 09 2017