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digitalmars.D.learn - 9999999999999999.0 - 9999999999999998.0

reply Samir <samir aol.com> writes:
I saw the following thread[1] today on Hacker News that discusses 
an article that compares how various languages compute 
9999999999999999.0 - 9999999999999998.0.  A surprisingly large 
number of languages return 2 as the answer.  I ran the following 
which returned 1:

import std.stdio: writeln;
void main(){
     writeln(cast(double)9999999999999999.0-9999999999999998.0);
}

I don't know anything about IEEE 754[2] which, according to the 
HN discussion, is the standard for floating point arthimetic, but 
was pleasantly surprised to see how D handles this.  Does anyone 
know why?

Thanks
Samir

[1] https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=18832155
[2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_754
Jan 05
next sibling parent Adam D. Ruppe <destructionator gmail.com> writes:
On Sunday, 6 January 2019 at 00:20:40 UTC, Samir wrote:
 import std.stdio: writeln;
 void main(){
     writeln(cast(double)9999999999999999.0-9999999999999998.0);
 }
That's because it is done at compile time, since both are compile-time constants. The compiler will evaluate it using the maximum precision available to the compiler, ignoring your request to cast it to double (which annoys some people who value predictability over precision btw). At different precisions, you get different results. I suggest breaking it up into a different variable to force a runtime evaluation instead of using the compiler's constant folding. import std.stdio: writeln; void main(){ double d = 9999999999999999.0; writeln(d-9999999999999998.0); } This gives 1. Making it float instead of double, you get something different. With real (which btw is higher precision, but terrible speed), you get 1 - this is what the compiler happened to use at compile time.
Jan 05
prev sibling next sibling parent Jesse Phillips <Jesse.K.Phillips+D gmail.com> writes:
On Sunday, 6 January 2019 at 00:20:40 UTC, Samir wrote:
 [1] https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=18832155
 [2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_754
Since you got your answer you may also like http://dconf.org/2016/talks/clugston.html
Jan 05
prev sibling parent Samir <samir aol.com> writes:
On Sunday, 6 January 2019 at 01:05:08 UTC, Adam D. Ruppe wrote:
 That's because it is done at compile time, since both are 
 compile-time constants. The compiler will evaluate it using the 
 maximum precision available to the compiler, ignoring your 
 request to cast it to double (which annoys some people who 
 value predictability over precision btw). At different 
 precisions, you get different results.
Thanks for that explanation, Adam! Very helpful. On Sunday, 6 January 2019 at 03:33:45 UTC, Jesse Phillips wrote:
 Since you got your answer you may also like
 http://dconf.org/2016/talks/clugston.html
Thank you for pointing out that talk, Jesse. I will set aside some time to go through that! Samir
Jan 06